How to Choose Your Snowboard Size

Rider Quiver

Get measured up with our length calculator

Once you’ve chosen a model of snowboard, selecting the right size can make a big difference to the fun you’ll have on it. There are a few numbers involved here, but relax – you don't have to be a math genius. 

Got your info? Let’s go.

 

How to Use Our Length Charts

Snowboard construction has come a long way in the last few years. By fine-tuning the flex and sidecut, and introducing new materials, it’s become possible to create super fun snowboards that break convention in terms of length and width. 

That said, a snowboard length calculator like the one below provides you with a useful starting point. It’s based on the key variables of weight, height and shoe size and is still appropriate for most models on the market. If a board is meant to be ridden shorter than your standard size then the manufacturer and/or shop staff should make that clear. 

Weight is the most important factor, so we recommend using the weight chart first, then cross referencing the result with the height chart. Width comes next; it plays an important part in how stable the board feels, and how quickly it responds from edge to edge (see our deep dive Do I Need a Wide Snowboard?) but it’s even more critical if you have big feet.


Men’s Snowboard Length Chart

Rider Weight

95-160 lbs / 43-72 kg

110- 180 lbs / 50-81 kg

150-200 lbs /68-90 kg

160-230 lbs / 72-105 kg

Snowboard Length

145-150

150-155

155-160

160-165

 

Rider Height

5’4”-5’8” ft/in / 162-173 cm

5’6”-5’10” ft/in / 167-177 cm

5’8”-6’2” ft/in / 173-187 cm

6’-6’4” ft/in / 182-195 cm

Snowboard Length

145-150

150-155

155-160

160-165

 

Men’s Snowboard Width Chart

Rider Shoe Size

7-10 US / 6-9 UK / 39-43 EU

9-11 US / 8-10 UK / 42-44,5 EU

10,5-14 US / 9,5-13 UK / 44-48,5 EU

Snowboard Width

24,8-25,4

25,4-26,1

26,1-27,4

 

Women’s Snowboard Length Chart

Rider Weight

75-114 lbs / 35-52 kg

100- 143 lbs / 45-65 kg

120-175 lbs /55-80 kg

Snowboard Length

135-142

142-147

147-153

 

Rider Height

4’11”-5’5” ft/in / 150-165 cm

5’1”-5’7” ft/in / 155-170 cm

5’3”-5’10” ft/in / 160-180 cm

Snowboard Length

135-142

142-147

147-153

 

Women’s Snowboard Width Chart

Rider Shoe Size

5-9 US / 2,5-6,5 UK / 35-40 EU

8-11 US / 6-8,5 UK / 39-42,5 EU

Snowboard Width

23,9-24,4

24,4-25,1

As you can see, our charts spit out a range of sizes rather than one absolute number. The truth is that there’s no such thing as the perfect length for every rider of the same weight/height. Once you’ve got a ballpark figure, your final decision needs to account for riding style, ability and fitness. 

With that in mind, let’s take a look at whether you’re better off going towards the longer or shorter end of the scale.

 

Benefits of more length

Are you a powerful rider that likes railing turns down groomers, hitting big booters and drawing critical lines through the backcountry? These are all reasons to buy a longer snowboard. 

Longer snowboards are more stable at high speeds and boast a greater surface area than a shorter board of the same width, so they’ll float better in powder. An increase in running length also improves edge hold, which means you can carve more aggressively on hardpack. Last up, you’re less likely to sketch out on heavy landings because you have more nose and tail to lean into before falling over. 

The downside of longer boards is that they’re a little heavier, they take more effort to turn and they’re less easy to chuck spins.

 

Benefits of less length

If you're all about technical tricks in the park and street, or generally getting creative off every bump or side hit, then you’ll likely appreciate a shorter snowboard. 

Shorter snowboards will turn on a dime and are easier to throw around. With less nose and tail to flex, butters and presses are a breeze – so you can save your energy for hiking your favorite rail. Freestyle and park-focused snowboards tend to be shorter for all these reasons.

The main downsides of choosing a shorter snowboard are that it will be less stable at high speed and won’t hold an edge as well in hard snow and ice.

 

Benefits of more width

As mentioned above, there’s a growing trend towards slightly wider snowboards. In the past, increasing the waist dimensions could make a board feel plank-like, but it’s now possible to design wide models that are almost as lively and nimble as a standard width. 

The benefit is that wider boards offer more lift in powder and slush, and more power when they’re set on edge – which is awesome for carving. They’re less twitchy, too, so when it comes to freestyle you have a stable platform for launching and landing tricks. 

The downside of wider boards is that they’re slightly heavier and will still be a little less agile from edge to edge.